August 18, 2014

rhamphotheca:

Flock of Ancient ‘Butterfly-Headed’ Flying Reptiles Discovered

by Tia Ghose

An ancient flying reptile with a bizarre, butterflylike head has been unearthed in Brazil.

The new-found pterosaur species, Caiuajara dobruskii, lived about 80 million years ago in an ancient desert oasis. The beast sported a strange bony crest on its head that looked like the wings of a butterfly, and had the wingspan needed to take flight at a very young age.

Hundreds of fossils from the reptile were unearthed in a single bone bed, providing the strongest evidence yet that the flying reptiles were social animals, said study co-author Alexander Kellner, a paleontologist at the Museu Nacional/Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro in Brazil…

(read more: Live Science)

illustration by Maurilio Oliveira/Museu Nacional-UFR; photos: Manzig et al, PLOS ONE 2014

(via lostbeasts)

August 17, 2014

elespermatozoidemesozoico:

Tyrannosaurus rex skeleton in the AMNH in New York.
And also the skulls of a T-rex and an Albertosaurus, another tyrannosaurid.
As you probably realize, this is next to the Allosaurus skeleton and in front of the Apatosaurus one.

Un Tiranosaurio Rex en el Museo Americano de Historia Natural.
Con él los cráneos de otro T-rex y un Albertosaurus, otro tiranosáurido.
Como quizás hayan notado, esta exhibición está al lado del esqueleto de Allosaurus y en frente del Apatosaurus.

August 14, 2014

snarkydiscolizard:

I WAS LOOKING UP PICTURES OF CASSOWARIES AND

image

I JUST

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help

JESUS

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make eye contact and i will disembowel you

(via soloporsertu)

August 12, 2014

elespermatozoidemesozoico:

A huge Apatosaurus skeleton and also some sauropods skulls in the AMNH in New York.
Photos by me

Un gran esqueleto de Apatosaurio y algunos cráneos de saurópodos en Museo Americano de Historia Natural en Nueva York.
Fotos mías.

August 11, 2014
Megamastax, the first vertebrate apex predator. By Brian Choo for nature.com
"Over a shallow Silurian seabed off the South China microcontinent, a spawning aggregation of jawless galeaspids (Dunyu longiferus) is rudely interrupted by the jaws of a 4-foot long Megamastax. Small acanthodians and the antiarch Silurolepis platydorsalis swim in the background. For the first time in Earth’s history, a vertebrate is at the top of the food chain.” Keep reading

Megamastax, the first vertebrate apex predator. By Brian Choo for nature.com

"Over a shallow Silurian seabed off the South China microcontinent, a spawning aggregation of jawless galeaspids (Dunyu longiferus) is rudely interrupted by the jaws of a 4-foot long Megamastax. Small acanthodians and the antiarch Silurolepis platydorsalis swim in the background. For the first time in Earth’s history, a vertebrate is at the top of the food chain.” Keep reading

August 10, 2014
Cotylorhynchus romeri by Maxim Sinitsa

Cotylorhynchus romeri by Maxim Sinitsa

August 9, 2014
ewilloughby:

Changyuraptor yangi is a newly-described microraptorine dromaeosaur dinosaur from the early Cretaceous (Yixian formation) of Liaoning, China.
The animal would have been around 4 feet long in life, and its fossil shows that it was covered in feathers — including, as in its smaller cousin Microraptor, a pair of “leg wings” represented by long paired pennaceous feathers on the metatarsals and tibiotarsus. One of Changyuraptor's most unique features is its voluminous tail feathers, and these feathers constitute the longest of any known non-avian dinosaur, with the most distal retrices reaching around 30 cm in length.
Changyuraptor is also by far the largest “four-winged” dinosaur known, and while this might not be as big of a deal as it sounds (given that there aren’t very many “four-winged” dinosaurs), it does show that small size wasn’t necessarily the gatekeeper to certain volant adaptations. I personally doubt that this animal was doing anything approaching powered flight, but the long tail feathers and multiple sets of long, well-developed lifting surfaces may have been a boon to gliding and controlled descent. The exceptionally long tail feathers therefore might have been used as a sort of “pitch control” device, wherein a large, relatively heavy animal would have needed especially fine-tuned control over rapid falls onto prey or in safe landings from higher ground. As Buzz Lightyear would say, “This isn’t flying, it’s falling with style!”
—
Gouache paint on A3-size hot-pressed illustration board, approx. 5-6 hours.
Gang Han et al. 2014. “A new raptorial dinosaur with exceptionally long feathering provides insights into dromaeosaurid flight performance”. Nature Communications. 5: 4382.

ewilloughby:

Changyuraptor yangi is a newly-described microraptorine dromaeosaur dinosaur from the early Cretaceous (Yixian formation) of Liaoning, China.

The animal would have been around 4 feet long in life, and its fossil shows that it was covered in feathers — including, as in its smaller cousin Microraptor, a pair of “leg wings” represented by long paired pennaceous feathers on the metatarsals and tibiotarsus. One of Changyuraptor's most unique features is its voluminous tail feathers, and these feathers constitute the longest of any known non-avian dinosaur, with the most distal retrices reaching around 30 cm in length.

Changyuraptor is also by far the largest “four-winged” dinosaur known, and while this might not be as big of a deal as it sounds (given that there aren’t very many “four-winged” dinosaurs), it does show that small size wasn’t necessarily the gatekeeper to certain volant adaptations. I personally doubt that this animal was doing anything approaching powered flight, but the long tail feathers and multiple sets of long, well-developed lifting surfaces may have been a boon to gliding and controlled descent. The exceptionally long tail feathers therefore might have been used as a sort of “pitch control” device, wherein a large, relatively heavy animal would have needed especially fine-tuned control over rapid falls onto prey or in safe landings from higher ground. As Buzz Lightyear would say, “This isn’t flying, it’s falling with style!”

Gouache paint on A3-size hot-pressed illustration board, approx. 5-6 hours.

Gang Han et al. 2014. “A new raptorial dinosaur with exceptionally long feathering provides insights into dromaeosaurid flight performance”. Nature Communications. 5: 4382.

August 9, 2014
joerojasburke:

Earth’s first life forms survived a massive bombardment by asteroids that completely remade the planet’s surface around 4.5 billion years ago. Few if any areas escaped impacts powerful enough to force molten magma onto the surface. That’s according to a new reconstruction by Simone Marchi and co-authors, which would explain the lack of rocks on Earth older than the Hadean period. 
Image: An artist’s imagined view of the early Earth, showing a surface pocked by asteroid impacts, resulting in extrusion of magma.

Here’s the artist’s page: Simone Marchi, and two more pictures:

joerojasburke:

Earth’s first life forms survived a massive bombardment by asteroids that completely remade the planet’s surface around 4.5 billion years ago. Few if any areas escaped impacts powerful enough to force molten magma onto the surface. That’s according to a new reconstruction by Simone Marchi and co-authors, which would explain the lack of rocks on Earth older than the Hadean period. 

Image: An artist’s imagined view of the early Earth, showing a surface pocked by asteroid impacts, resulting in extrusion of magma.

Here’s the artist’s page: Simone Marchi, and two more pictures:

August 6, 2014

jtotheizzoe:

Science fans and book lovers! I’ve got a special challenge for you… 

I’m teaming up with the amazing book project Call me Ishmael for the first of what we’re calling an “All Call Challenge"… 

What does that mean? We want YOU to tell a story of a book that changed the way you look at the natural world. You can hear the full details on the challenge, plus hear a book-themed interview with me by clicking here, or by checking out the video below:

I’m betting you smart people are full of amazing stories about amazing stories. Remember, if you do submit your story to Call Me ishmael, make sure to say that you’re answering the It’s Okay To Be Smart “All Call” challenge!  I’m willing to bet a few more of your favorite YouTubers will be issuing “All Calls” in the near future, too. 

A few of you figured it out already, but I answered my own challenge yesterday, in this “anonymous” Call Me Ishmael submission

Help us spread the word, stay curious, and keep on reading! 

8:30pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZTlDuw1NY9LYr
  
Filed under: signal boost 
July 28, 2014

elespermatozoidemesozoico:

Edmontosaurus skeletons in the AMNH.
And also the Charles R. Knight painting, made at a time when it was thought that this was a Trachodon. They later renamed it Anatosaurus, them Anatotitan and know is know that is just a species of the Edmontosaurus.
Photos by me

Esqueletos de Edmontosaurus en el AMNH.
Con ellos el cuadro de Charles R. Knight, quién lo hizo en un tiempo en que estos animales se llamaban Trachodon. Luego se los llamó Anatosaurus, después Anatotitan y ahora se sabe que no es más que una especie de Edmontosaurus.
Yo tomé las fotos.

July 26, 2014
dimetrodone:

100% scientifically accurate paleoart of the recently described dinosaur kulindadromeus zabaikalicus

Kulindadromeus is all over Tumblr, I assume that all of you know about the discovery and how important it is and have seen Andrey Atuchin’s wonderful illustration a hundred times already. There’s no need for me to post that, but we all need to marvel at the greatness of dimetrodone's take on the subject.

dimetrodone:

100% scientifically accurate paleoart of the recently described dinosaur kulindadromeus zabaikalicus

Kulindadromeus is all over Tumblr, I assume that all of you know about the discovery and how important it is and have seen Andrey Atuchin’s wonderful illustration a hundred times already. There’s no need for me to post that, but we all need to marvel at the greatness of dimetrodone's take on the subject.

(via tyrannosaurslair)

July 23, 2014
Bairdemys by Jorge Antonio González

Bairdemys by Jorge Antonio González

July 21, 2014
Prehistoric Animals

Submitted by arse-moriendi:

Hi all! I was cleaning out my garage when I found this little treasure:

This books has been well-loved over the years, as evidenced by the scribbling (not me, I swear) and it is, unfortunately missing a few pages. But I scanned them and cleaned them up as best I could, and now I want to share one of my favorite books:

July 20, 2014

elespermatozoidemesozoico:

Here are some photos I took of the famous Allosaurus eating an Apatosaurus in the American Museum of Natural History in New York.
And also the famous Charles R. Knight restoration.

Acá algunas fotos que tomé del famoso Allosaurus comiéndose los restos de un Apatosaurus en el Museo Americano de Historia Natural en Nueva York.
Con ello también estaba el famoso cuadro de Charles R. Knight.

July 20, 2014

 ”Eearth’s history panel” by Alberto Gennari for the “Museo dell’ Ambiente” of the University of Salento.