September 28, 2014

Nasutoceratops tittusi by Román García Mora:

"Paleo-reconstruction of a pack of Nasutoceratops titusi, a ceratopsian dinosaur from the Kaiparowits Formation, Late Cretaceus of Noth America.”

September 11, 2014
Wading by Luke Mancini:
"Inspired by egrets in the creek between my place and work, a non-avian cousin enjoys foraging in a somewhat more natural environment. I had the tail in a more traditionally ‘dinosaur’y curve for most of the process but actually quite like the straight (more accurate) version in the end."

Wading by Luke Mancini:

"Inspired by egrets in the creek between my place and work, a non-avian cousin enjoys foraging in a somewhat more natural environment. I had the tail in a more traditionally ‘dinosaur’y curve for most of the process but actually quite like the straight (more accurate) version in the end."

September 10, 2014
Compsognathus longipes sketch by Antresoll:
"I decided to try myself in fast watercolor sketches, so here it is the first one: two Compsognathus longipes catching cockroaches near large manure heap :)"

Compsognathus longipes sketch by Antresoll:

"I decided to try myself in fast watercolor sketches, so here it is the first one: two Compsognathus longipes catching cockroaches near large manure heap :)"

August 12, 2014

elespermatozoidemesozoico:

A huge Apatosaurus skeleton and also some sauropods skulls in the AMNH in New York.
Photos by me

Un gran esqueleto de Apatosaurio y algunos cráneos de saurópodos en Museo Americano de Historia Natural en Nueva York.
Fotos mías.

August 9, 2014
ewilloughby:

Changyuraptor yangi is a newly-described microraptorine dromaeosaur dinosaur from the early Cretaceous (Yixian formation) of Liaoning, China.
The animal would have been around 4 feet long in life, and its fossil shows that it was covered in feathers — including, as in its smaller cousin Microraptor, a pair of “leg wings” represented by long paired pennaceous feathers on the metatarsals and tibiotarsus. One of Changyuraptor's most unique features is its voluminous tail feathers, and these feathers constitute the longest of any known non-avian dinosaur, with the most distal retrices reaching around 30 cm in length.
Changyuraptor is also by far the largest “four-winged” dinosaur known, and while this might not be as big of a deal as it sounds (given that there aren’t very many “four-winged” dinosaurs), it does show that small size wasn’t necessarily the gatekeeper to certain volant adaptations. I personally doubt that this animal was doing anything approaching powered flight, but the long tail feathers and multiple sets of long, well-developed lifting surfaces may have been a boon to gliding and controlled descent. The exceptionally long tail feathers therefore might have been used as a sort of “pitch control” device, wherein a large, relatively heavy animal would have needed especially fine-tuned control over rapid falls onto prey or in safe landings from higher ground. As Buzz Lightyear would say, “This isn’t flying, it’s falling with style!”
—
Gouache paint on A3-size hot-pressed illustration board, approx. 5-6 hours.
Gang Han et al. 2014. “A new raptorial dinosaur with exceptionally long feathering provides insights into dromaeosaurid flight performance”. Nature Communications. 5: 4382.

ewilloughby:

Changyuraptor yangi is a newly-described microraptorine dromaeosaur dinosaur from the early Cretaceous (Yixian formation) of Liaoning, China.

The animal would have been around 4 feet long in life, and its fossil shows that it was covered in feathers — including, as in its smaller cousin Microraptor, a pair of “leg wings” represented by long paired pennaceous feathers on the metatarsals and tibiotarsus. One of Changyuraptor's most unique features is its voluminous tail feathers, and these feathers constitute the longest of any known non-avian dinosaur, with the most distal retrices reaching around 30 cm in length.

Changyuraptor is also by far the largest “four-winged” dinosaur known, and while this might not be as big of a deal as it sounds (given that there aren’t very many “four-winged” dinosaurs), it does show that small size wasn’t necessarily the gatekeeper to certain volant adaptations. I personally doubt that this animal was doing anything approaching powered flight, but the long tail feathers and multiple sets of long, well-developed lifting surfaces may have been a boon to gliding and controlled descent. The exceptionally long tail feathers therefore might have been used as a sort of “pitch control” device, wherein a large, relatively heavy animal would have needed especially fine-tuned control over rapid falls onto prey or in safe landings from higher ground. As Buzz Lightyear would say, “This isn’t flying, it’s falling with style!”

Gouache paint on A3-size hot-pressed illustration board, approx. 5-6 hours.

Gang Han et al. 2014. “A new raptorial dinosaur with exceptionally long feathering provides insights into dromaeosaurid flight performance”. Nature Communications. 5: 4382.

July 20, 2014

elespermatozoidemesozoico:

Here are some photos I took of the famous Allosaurus eating an Apatosaurus in the American Museum of Natural History in New York.
And also the famous Charles R. Knight restoration.

Acá algunas fotos que tomé del famoso Allosaurus comiéndose los restos de un Apatosaurus en el Museo Americano de Historia Natural en Nueva York.
Con ello también estaba el famoso cuadro de Charles R. Knight.

June 16, 2014

The art of Mark Gregory | Tumblr

June 13, 2014
nathan-e-rogers:

Diabloceratops eatoni
A centrosaurine ceratopsian from the Wahweap Formation of Utah, this dinosaur was first described in 2010 by James Kirkland and Donald DeBlieux. It lived during the Late Cretaceous (Campanian Age) about 79 million years ago.
Considering that the modern Rocky Mountains were being formed at the time, it seems possible that an unfortunate Diabloceratops might have encountered volcanoes. Volcanic lightning is a real natural phenomenon, and if you haven’t seen photos I highly recommend an image search – it’s amazing.
After the last few calm, quiet scenes I’ve painted, I figured a different tone might be fun, though the results may be straying dangerously close to something one might encounter on the side of a van… in the 1980’s…
Please do not reproduce or use without permission.

nathan-e-rogers:

Diabloceratops eatoni

A centrosaurine ceratopsian from the Wahweap Formation of Utah, this dinosaur was first described in 2010 by James Kirkland and Donald DeBlieux. It lived during the Late Cretaceous (Campanian Age) about 79 million years ago.

Considering that the modern Rocky Mountains were being formed at the time, it seems possible that an unfortunate Diabloceratops might have encountered volcanoes. Volcanic lightning is a real natural phenomenon, and if you haven’t seen photos I highly recommend an image search – it’s amazing.

After the last few calm, quiet scenes I’ve painted, I figured a different tone might be fun, though the results may be straying dangerously close to something one might encounter on the side of a van… in the 1980’s…

Please do not reproduce or use without permission.

June 11, 2014

Art from the videogame Dino Run. Free browser-based version and downloadable app.

Thanks to notaproperperson for telling me about this!

June 10, 2014

Concavenator corcovatus by Román García Mora

June 9, 2014

Griseus: Mr. Csotonyi can draw feathers, protofeathers and whatever is necessary, we are talking about one of the best paleoartists ever. Above there are three of my favorites, but here’s his gallery, take a look.

June 9, 2014

"The Paleoart of Julius Csotonyi". There’s an excellent review by Mark Witton, and you can support original palaeoart by buying the book

June 6, 2014
Deinocheirus by Sergio Pérez. Based on this photograph:

Deinocheirus by Sergio Pérez. Based on this photograph:

June 6, 2014
I honestly don’t know what this “donut day” tumblr thing is, but here’s my contribution to the cause: ”Dinosaur Donut” by Will Koffman

I honestly don’t know what this “donut day” tumblr thing is, but here’s my contribution to the cause: ”Dinosaur Donut” by Will Koffman

June 2, 2014

Paintings and T-Shirt by John Conway, paleoartist and troll extraordinaire.

Also, I want to recommend this blog: …is not a dinosaur.

(Source: log.johnconway.c)